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CategoryEconomics

Where we deal with the welfare of humankind

The Summer is beneficial for more than its weather and your vacation time.

During the summer months a great way to invest in your career is to join a professional organization. You have a group of like minded individuals who are passionate about their career just as you are. You may gain knowledge and insight on ways to prosper as well as having the potential to be beneficial to someone else in their quest also. These summer months are perfect for networking and investing. Here are a list of small business organizations that are well known and highly recommended. This list is an example, just the tip of the iceberg. Let it inspire you to explore.

http://quickbooks.intuit.com/r/local/small-business-organizations-you-should-get-to-know/

Axess Event Center – Trina – Pictures

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Trina definitely showed after her long successful career that she still holds the flame to rock a crowd. This event was brought to us by Trinity Enterprise & A.E. promotions

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Adam Elam on the left
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Keidra of Keedie’s Corner left and Kaynah of Trinity Enterprise right

Also in the building we had “Redd” from “Bad Girls Clubs” season 12 & 13

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The lovely Keidra CEO of Keedie’s Corner

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Dj Swole 386

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AND OF COURSE the lady of the hour Trina. You do not want to miss this movie we shot courtesy of Hustle Blood Films and Keedie’s Corner!!! Trina really shut it down. STAY TUNED!!!

Daytona Native Genesis Robinson Advocates the “Affordable Health Care Act”

In this past year or two, Health Care has become a more pressed issue then it has ever been. Having health care is a good thing, right? Well, a lot of people have had issues with the new Health Care movement. Wether it may be that they can’t afford it or they may rather find another source of payment. With that being said, we understand that the people needed inside information on this touchy subject so there can be closure on the issue. In this financial crisis, people attach the new health care movement with other tactical plots to salvage our economy. Why don’t the people understand that this is actually a great opportunity for them? Well, in order to get to the bottom of this we talked to Daytona native , now residing in Washington D.C., Genesis Robinson about his roll in the “Affordable Health Care Act”. With only days left to sign up, here is how Genesis kicked the people some knowledge in our exclusive interview.

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1) (We first got his full name which has been expressed above)

2.Birth place and current residence (if you relocated for an occupation, explain)

Daytona Beach, FL

In January 2013 I moved to Washington D.C. to take a job with the Federal Government.

3.What is your occupation?

Congressional Staffer

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4.Explain your role in helping people apply for health care.

Since open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) begin, I have worked to ensure that everyone I know is enrolled in a healthcare plan that meets their needs and is within their budget. Via my role as Federal employee who works for a member of Congress and private citizen who is concerned about ensuring everyone has access to quality healthcare, I have been able to assist a bevy of people with enrollment. I have worked with both professional and civic organizations to ensure that everyone I know is enrolled. I have assisted people from all walks of life; everyone from family and friends to strangers and acquaintances.

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5.On a financial level, how can the government benefit from having the majority of citizens insured?

    Not only does the government benefit from having the majority of citizens insured, but private citizens do too. When someone whose uninsured needs emergency care, the bill for that care is passed on to hardworking people who have their own bills of their own to pay and maintain. By requiring everyone to maintain and pay for an insurance plan, it reduces the cost for everyone.

  Example:  

It’s very similar to a group of friends deciding to split the cost for dinner. Imagine being at dinner with 10 people, and you get a bill for $100, yet only 4 people split the bill with you. That makes 6 people who did not contribute to the cost of the final bill and as a result, the price is increased for the 4 people who had to pay. Whereas, if all 10 people paid, the cost is distributed among those who ate and price is lowered for everyone involved.

6.What advice do you have for those who don’t have health care?  

Get insured! The deadline to start your application is March 31, 2014. If you don’t believe that you can complete the application by that date, just start. The Obama Administration has extended the deadline to Mid-April for those who start the process by March 31, 2014.Having healthcare can potentially save your life and add years to your life.
Even if you are unsure about the cost, get on the website and search the plans. Most people are eligible for a subsidy which pays a large part of the plan for you. I have helped people enroll for a plan and they had to pay NOTHING. As a fan of basketball, I would say that “you miss 100% of the shots that you don’t take”.

7.When is the deadline to enroll?  

The deadline to start enrollment is Monday, March 31, 2014  

However, the Obama Administration has announced that people who started the application process by the March 31st deadline will be able to quality for an extension until Mid- April. To qualify for an extension, a person should check the blue box on HealthCare.gov to indicate that they tried to enroll before the deadline.

8. Do you have any links or tips that can help people get started?  

With the March 31 enrollment deadline so close, I don’t recommend using a paper application. You can enroll entirely online right now. Or you can contact the Marketplace call center at 1-800-318-2596 (TTY: 1-855-889-4325) to apply, pick a plan, and enroll.  

9. What is needed to apply for an affordable healthcare plan?  

• Social Security Numbers (or document numbers for legal immigrants)
• Employer and income information for every member of your household who needs coverage (for example, from pay stubs or W-2 forms-Wage and Tax Statements)
•Policy numbers for any current health insurance plans covering members of your household              

10. How can someone avoid paying a penalty?

  To avoid the penalty you need insurance that qualifies as minimum essential coverage. If you’re covered by any of the following in 2014, you’re considered covered and don’t have to pay a penalty:

• Any Marketplace plan, or any individual insurance plan you already have
•Any employer plan (including COBRA), with or without “grandfathered” status. This includes retiree plans
• Medicare
•Medicaid
•The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
•TRICARE (for current service members and military retirees, their families, and survivors)
• Veterans health care programs (including the Veterans Health Care Program, VA Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA), and Spina Bifida Health Care Benefits Program)
• Peace Corps Volunteer plans
• Self-funded health coverage offered to students by universities for plan or policy years that begin on or before Dec. 31, 2014

11.What will be deducted from your 2015 income tax if you do not get health insurance this year?

The penalty in 2014 is calculated one of 2 ways. You’ll pay whichever of these amounts is higher:

•1% of your yearly household income. (Only the amount of income above the tax filing threshold (which is $10,150) for an individual, is used to calculate the penalty.)

  • The maximum fine a individual could be penalized is the national          average for a yearly premium for a bronze plan (which currently is about $9,800)

For example, a single person who will earn $35,000 in 2014, the penalty would be $249 ($35,000 – $10,150 = $24,850 x 1% = $249).

•$95 per person over 18 for the year ($47.50 per child under 18).
The maximum penalty per family using this method is $285.

The way the penalty is calculated, a single adult with household income between $10,150 – $19,650 would pay the $95 flat rate. A single adult with household income above $19,650 would pay an amount based on the 1 percent rate. (If income is below $10,150, no penalty is owed.)

The penalty increases every year. In 2015 it’s 2% of income or $325 per person. In 2016 and later years it’s 2.5% of income or $695 per person. After that it’s adjusted for inflation.

If you’re uninsured for just part of the year, 1/12 of the yearly penalty applies to each month you’re uninsured. If you’re uninsured for less than 3 months, you don’t have to make a payment.  

12.  What can people do to spread the word?

Telling others about the benefits and importance of signing up for Health Care is vitally important. As a community we must make it our responsibility to ensure that each other is covered and has all relevant information to make an informed decision about our health. We can spread the word via social media, word of mouth, through civic and social organizations (church, fraternity/sorority, book club, neighborhood watch groups, and etc.)  

13. Why do you think it is important for people to enroll for healthcare?

I think affordable healthcare is vitally important because it allows people to live healthier and longer lives. Having access to quality care not only helps when you are sick and ill, but it can also serve as a deterrent to prevent you from being more susceptible to diseases and infections prior to them developing.   Additionally, I think it is important that people enroll in a health care plan through the Affordable Care Act because it shows the President that we support his vision and are appreciative for the sacrifice he made to vouch for the millions of uninsured Americans. For people to not follow up and enroll in healthcare after the President spent so much political capital to get the Bill passed is both asinine and irresponsible.
 
  I believe that some people have allowed the media to cloud their judgment and plant seeds of doubt into their minds about the effectiveness and/or need for a law that provides affordable healthcare to everyone regardless of their race, religion, gender and/or socio-economic status. We mustn’t forget that for over 100 years prior to President Obama, every President has tried to get meaningful healthcare reform, but failed.

  Healthcare reform is by far the most important legislative victory for African Americans. At a time when African Americans are disproportionally more likely to suffer from illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure and we are 55% less likely to have health insurance than our white counterparts, we cannot allow this opportunity to get covered and start living healthy lifestyles pass us by. Because of the Affordable Care Act, there is now, almost 7 million African Americans who now have access to affordable care for the first time in their life. Ensuring they capitalize on that is paramount to the long-term progression of our community.    

Helpful Websites:  

https://www.healthcare.gov/  
http://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/facts/factsheets/2012/04/aca-and-african-americans04122012a.html  
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/earl-ofari-hutchinson/obamacare-is-a-triumph-fo_b_4010984.html  

When on social media use the following hash tags:  

#GetCovered
#ACA
#BlackMenEnroll
#GetCoveredNow
#AffordableCareAct

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Written by: Bruce Walton and Genesis Robinson
Published by: Keedie’s Corner

5 Innovative Trends in Women’s Economic Equality

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Investing in women creates amultiplier effect for society – including better health and education outcomes, more resilient societies, reinvestment in communities, and greater prosperity. While there has been overall progress globally, women in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) still face some of the greatest barriers in asserting their economic rights.To help break through these barriers, the Women Powering Work: Innovations for Economic Equality in MENA online competition, launched by Ashoka Changemakers and General Electric, was launched to support innovations that enable full economic participation by women. Nine competition finalists have emerged who are building quality livelihoods and securing economic rights for women across the region. The competition is also uncovering a series of trends that demonstrate how investing in women’s economic equality is smart.

The Women Powering Work competition received 107 applications from more than 23 countries, spanning very diverse economic, social, and political contexts. In the spirit of open learning and collaboration, below is a list of the finalists and the themes that are emerging from their solutions.

Who are the finalists?BADAWEYA Women’s Handicraft Initiative, EgyptBusanti, PakistandoctHERS-in-the-House, PakistanFarm to Market: Seeding Afghan Women Entrepreneurs, AfghanistanHandasiyat.net, JordanKhadija Program – Technology for Development, YemenNabbesh’s www Initiative: Work that Works for Women, UAEPoverty Female Prisoners & Their Children, EgyptWomen’s Digital League – Celebrating the Strength, Courage and Talent of Pakistani Women One Digital Task at a Time, PakistanEmerging Trends:

Trend #1: Reinvent Jobs for Maximum FlexibilityWhen Maria Umar was refused maternity leave as a teacher, she quit her job and worked to found an online company that would offer flexibility in work options for any woman who needs it. Umar’s organization,Women’s Digital League (Pakistan), and two other finalists — Nabbesh(United Arab Emirates) and engineering firm Handasiyat.net(Jordan) — are creating project-based jobs that women can easily access online. A key part of their success is customizing their services to meet the unique needs of their local context. They are securing partnerships with local companies to ensure quality jobs are available for posting, embedding ratings systems to help employees build their reputation, and partnering with NGOs to provide training and infrastructure to access IT jobs in hard to reach, rural communities.

Trend #2: Partner for Entrepreneurial Success — Create Access to MarketsA number of changemakers are not only helping women to establish their own micro-enterprises but also providing them with the services and partnerships they need to grow into medium-to -large sized businesses. Projects such as Badaweya Handicraft Initiative (Egypt) and Afghan Women Entrepreneurs (Afghanistan) are delivering skills trainings, providing start-up materials, coupling skills-trainings with consulting advice about how to make enterprises successful, and also linking women to distributors and networks to ensure their products can reach enough customers to make a profit. Afghan Women Entrepreneurs, along with the Khadija Technology Program (Yemen), step further outside the box by focusing on industries such as farming and information technology, giving women the training, access to partner networks, and experience needed to establish their own enterprises in fields that aren’t limited to handicrafts.

Trend #3: Replace Intense Stigma with EmpowermentSometimes innovation can come from applying established solutions to previously unreached populations. A number of entries stood out for their focus on segments of women that were especially disenfranchised. Changemakers Finalist Children of Female Prisoners Association (CFPA) (Egypt) focuses on breaking the cycle of poverty and stigma faced by women who are imprisoned along with their children, many due to having small debts or due to the debts of relatives. CFPA provides vocational training and support and creates public campaigns to help ensure that women can break free of any stigma and become gainfully employed. Other entries focused on pioneering economic development opportunities for widows (Athar Foundation, Yemen), orphans (Woman to Woman, Jordan), and bedouins (Badaweya, Egypt).

Trend #4: Lift Environmental Barriers to EmploymentA few finalists stood out for proposing solutions that would ease access to jobs while also tackling environmental barriers that exacerbate the employment gender gap such as poor transportation and healthcare. In order to make it easier for women to get to jobs within cities, Busanti(Pakistan) not only seeks to provide safe, harassment-free transportation with women-only buses but also provides essential health-education during the transportation. DoctHERS in the house (Pakistan) is also finding innovative ways to deliver healthcare to the underserved but by utilizing technology to enable female doctors who cannot access the workplace to continue practicing medicine from home. They train local community nurses, provide diagnostic tools, and conduct examinations by remotely utilizing mobile and internet technology.

Trend #5: Engage Men as Part of the SolutionWhile a number of solutions are inspiring examples of social businesses for and by women, a key strategy for success cited by strong entries included deliberate efforts to ensure men in the community were engaged as full allies and participants in the economic development opportunities.  BADAWEYA Women’s Handicraft Initiative (Egypt), for example, ensures that activities also involve  husbands and brothers and that good relationships are maintained with tribal leaders.

With so many promising projects, inspiring changemakers, and social challenges needing solutions, it certainly wasn’t easy to narrow down the list to nine finalists or to recognize every strong applicant! With this in mind, our aim is to offer tools to help ensure that every applicant gains value from this experience. Resources we created as a result of this collaborative competition include: acustom feedback report highlighting strengths, areas for improvement. and suggested projects to learn from or partner with as well as aChangemaking Toolkit, where you can explore all projects related to the field of women’s economic development on a single map, navigate an interactive report about trends in social innovation for this field, access a guide to pitching and wooing funders, and more._This post was written by Reem Rahman (@reemrahman), who works at Ashoka@Changemakers as a Product and Knowledge Manager to help anyone with an idea for social change succeed in making a difference.Featured Image: ”A survey of the Afghan people” via Asian Development Bank and Compfight cc.