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The 13th, Puts Everything Happening In America Right Now In Perspective — MadameNoire

Last night I watched Ava DuVernay’s highly acclaimed documentary, The 13th. It wasn’t the most emotionally responsible thing to do while still mourning the results of Tuesday night’s election, but politically it put a lot of things into perspective. Namely, it answered the question everyone’s been asking that can’t be explained by voter turnout and poll…

via The 13th, Puts Everything Happening In America Right Now In Perspective — MadameNoire

#ViewsFromDaBooth: Emails and Intros.

What’s going on wit it? By now some of you are moving smarter in this music industry and some of y’all are now getting paid to perform. That’s wazzam. That means you are listening, maybe we can work together one day. This week we are going to cover something so simple, but often forgotten, how to send an email to a DJ. Let’s get into it.

First off, do you know how to send an email? No you don’t, stop lying! I receive probably more than 15 emails a day from artists, managers, promoters, anybody with a homeboy that raps. How do I choose which songs to check out when I am busy? Well. To keep it honest, I prefer the JUST the music. But if you must, a short 2-3 sentence bio, and the artwork for the song. I HATE, and I really do mean HATE, when an artist sends an email with a link in bio to click on their song. Make it easy on ah DJ, attach the song as an MP3! I’m not a fan that you need to be worried about getting an extra view on your song. Not at all, not at all. I am a DJ with very limited time. Not sure bout most DJs, but I love to check out new music while driving. And it’s easier for me to listen to an MP3 attachment than to click a link, scroll down, press play, stop the pop up add, blah blah blah, deleted.

If you know the DJ, include a short thank you note for him or her taking the time to listen. If you have never made contact with the DJ, please send an email asking if it is ok to send music. Or send an introductory email at least. I prefer communication directly from the artist or manager. This shows me that you took the time and consideration to reach out to me. OH! Real quick, why do you artists send one email to multiple DJS? I hate that. That’s a number one sign that you are a lazy artist that does not care to make a personal connection with DJs. When I see that, I instantly lose interest. Back to the point. Make sure that your email is short and quickly moves the DJ to listen to the song.

Before pressing send, make sure your email introduces both you and the record. We don’t care who else is playing it or how the club turns up when they hear it. Include the artwork, a picture is worth a thousand words. If the artwork is clean, gives a description of the song title, and looks like you spent money on it, we will definitely listen to the song. Lastly, just attach one song, clean and dirty version, as an MP3. It’s simple, to the point, and gives us the option to include it in radio and club mixes.

That’s all folks!

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DJ 3000

#ViewsFromDaBooth is a biweekly article from the south’s newest record breaker, DJ 3000. DJ 3000 is creator of mixtape series Off Da Brick, Finesse Game Strong, Private Party Kush, and DJ or Die Tryin’. He currently DJs at various night clubs in the Atlanta area. Follow him on Instagram @3000_da_DJ.

 

Expressing Condolences to an Acquaintance

By Suzie Kolber

You see her softly sobbing in her cubicle. You’ve heard the story that her father recently passed away, but you don’t know her very well. You only say “hi” when you come in or when you pass her a new file. What will you say when you pass by her today?

You’ve noticed how he avoids everyone lately, and he comes in late to work. You know his wife died a few weeks ago, and he’s just not the same. You haven’t had a reason to talk to him, but you have a meeting scheduled this afternoon with just the two of you. Should you broach the subject or pretend everything is normal?

These situations are awkward for the most eloquent people. For the average person, it can make them uncomfortable to be around someone who has suffered a loss. The question of whether to say something and if so, what should you say comes to everyone at one time or another. If you follow these guidelines, it won’t have to be so awkward to express condolences to an acquaintance.

Obvious Avoidance

Remember that if you feel you should say something and don’t, it will be obvious to the other person that you’re avoiding the subject. They will feel even more uncomfortable and alone. Instead, if the situation seems to call for some kind of expression of sympathy, do it.

You can keep the comments short and casual. In the first instance, you could simply say something like this:

“I heard about your loss and I wanted to express my sympathy. Let me know if you need more time to work on this file.”

The second situation calls for something a little more direct. Maybe you’re the supervisor or at least a co-worker involved in a project with the guy whose wife died. You need to broach the subject because it will be obvious if you’re ignoring it. And face it, he probably knows he’s not acting the same and he knows other people realize it as well. You can handle this situation by saying:

“I know this is a difficult time for you. I’m sorry for what you’re going through, and let me know if there’s any way I can help. I can take on more work for this project or give you an extension to the deadline.”

By offering solid suggestions for ways you can help, you take the focus off the death of the loved one and put it on helping them out. Many times, people don’t know what help is needed or what to ask for, and you offering a specific way of assisting them enables them to figure out how to deal with their grief.

Avoid trite comments just for the sake of saying something. You don’t need to say a lot to express your condolences, but make them words that count. Remember that not saying anything can make the situation more awkward than anything you might say. Even the most basic sentiments can help the person feel better and allow them the freedom to work through their grief with your support.

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Suzie Kolber is a writer at obituarieshelp.org . The site is a complete guide for someone seeking help for writing sympathy messages, condolence letters and funeral planning resources.